The Paris Agreement Goals

The Paris Agreement provides a sustainable framework that guides global efforts for decades to come. The aim is to increase countries` climate ambitions over time. To achieve this, the agreement provides for two review processes, each in a five-year cycle. The Paris Agreement is an environmental agreement that was adopted by almost all nations in 2015 to combat climate change and its negative effects. The agreement aims to significantly reduce global greenhouse gas emissions in order to limit global temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels this century, while continuing to pursue ways to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees. The agreement provides for the commitment of all major emitters to reduce their pollution from climate change and to strengthen these commitments over time. It provides developed countries with a means to assist developing countries in their mitigation and adaptation efforts and establishes a framework for monitoring, reporting and strengthening countries` individual and collective climate goals. The Paris Agreement (the Paris Agreement) [3] is an agreement within the framework of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that deals with the reduction, adaptation and financing of greenhouse gas emissions and was signed in 2016. The language of the agreement was negotiated by representatives of 196 States Parties at the 21st UNFCCC Conference of parties held at Le Bourget, near Paris, France, and agreed on 12 December 2015. [4] [5] Since February 2020, all 196 UNFCCC members have signed the agreement and 189 have left. [1] Of the seven countries that are not parties to the law, Iran and Turkey are the only major emitters.

From an international perspective, long-term strategies provide the Paris Agreement with credibility and certainty that its objectives can be achieved. They also increase transparency and build trust between nations, as each side shows its determination to work towards emissions neutrality and encourages others to follow suit. On the basis of positive reciprocity of measures, long-term strategies are an ideal tool for governments to communicate their resolve to combat climate change to other countries that need this information to assess their commitment. Countries must, among other things, report on their greenhouse gas inventories and their progress against their targets, so that external experts can assess their success.